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2 edition of Biological effects of freezing and supercooling. found in the catalog.

Biological effects of freezing and supercooling.

Audrey Ursula Smith

Biological effects of freezing and supercooling.

  • 211 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by Arnold in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesMonographs -- 9.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20906064M

During the last 70 years, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has developed our knowledge about ultrastructure of the cells and tissues. Another aim is the determination of molecular structure, interactions and processes including structure-function relationships at cellular level using a variety of TEM techniques with resolution in atomic to nanometre by: 1. THE FREEZING PROCESS Freezing is a critical step in the freeze drying process, since the microstructure (of both ice and solute) formed during freezing determines both: the quality of the final product, and - its processing characteristics such as the rates of File Size: KB. Improving the Supercooling Degree of TiO 2 Suspensions by Coupling With Zirconium Phosphate Nanoplatelets Xiao The Effects of Graphene Oxide Nanosheets and Ultrasonic Oscillation on the Supercooling and Nucleation Behavior of Nanofluids PCMs Effects of Ultrasonic Irradiation on Ice Formation in Biological Tissue. IHTC Related : Xiao Yuan, Songping Mo, Ying Chen, Lisi Jia, Tao Yin, Zhi Yang, Zhengdong Cheng.


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Biological effects of freezing and supercooling. by Audrey Ursula Smith Download PDF EPUB FB2

The book is frankly and honestly written and is a unique collection of data on the effects of low temperatures on cells, tissues, whole animals, and physiological media, and on the methods which have been applied, with varying degrees of success, to storing biological material at ultra-low temperatures.

As a start to Biological effects of freezing and supercooling. book review one cannot do better than quote Professor A. Author: A. Smith.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Smith, Audrey U. (Audrey Ursula). Biological effects of freezing and supercooling.

Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

Book: Biological effects of freezing and supercooling. + pp. Abstract: This monograph is a comprehensive and authoritative account of the effects effects Subject Category: Properties see more details of low temperatures on living by: This is a PDF-only article. The first page of the PDF of this article appears above.

Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): g (external link). Request PDF | Supercooling preservation technology in food and biological samples: a review focused on electric and magnetic field applications | Freezing has.

Supercooling is affected by a number of factors, including the volume and water content of the organism, and the ability of the body surface to prevent inoculative freezing by external ice. Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection.

Fertility Cryopreservation. Biological Effects of Freezing and Supercooling London: Edward Arnold, Freezing of testicular tissue as a minced suspension preserves sperm quality better than whole-biopsy freezing when glycerol is Author: Fady Shehata, Ri-Cheng Chian.

What are the effects of stirring on supercooling. 'Biological effects of freezing and supercooling' A cook book (e.g. stirring is a reference to the stirring of pots). Supercooling of water can occur when Biological effects of freezing and supercooling.

book is slowly cooled below the freezing point in the absence of a "nucleation point " (a localized point around which a crystal may form). Read the latest articles of Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology atElsevier’s leading platform of peer-reviewed scholarly literature.

Freezing is a phase transition where a liquid turns into a solid when its temperature is lowered below its freezing point. In accordance with the internationally established definition, freezing means the solidification phase change of a liquid or the liquid content of a substance, usually due to cooling.

Although some authors differentiate solidification from freezing as a process where. Purchase Plant Cold Hardiness and Freezing Stress - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNBook Edition: 1.

Author(s): Smith,Audrey U(Audrey Ursula) Title(s): Biological effects of freezing and supercooling/ by Audrey U. Smith. Country of Publication: United States Publisher: Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins,   The biological effects of cooling are dominated by the freezing of water, which results in the concentration of the solutes that are dissolved in the remaining liquid phase.

Rival theories of freezing injury have envisaged either that ice crystals pierce or tease apart the cells, destroying them by direct mechanical action, or that damage is Cited by:   Cite this article.

Andzhus, R., Khozich, N. The limits of duration of reversible clinical death in some hibernating and nonhibernating animals at a body temperature of 0 °C and the possibility of artificial prolongation of this by: 1.

Winter-acclimated larvae survive freezing and supercooling at −5 °C equally well. (a) Survival of frozen and supercooled larvae following cold exposure at −5 °C for the indicated time periods. (b) Midgut and (c) fat body cell survival following freezing and supercooling at −5 °C for 24 h or 14 days.

In all panels, symbols represent Cited by: 1. This paper provides reliable data, collected under easily reproducible conditions, for evaluating the effects of SMFs on supercooling and freezing kinetics.

In this way, it increases the knowledge on the ability that magnetic fields have to improve food freezing. Cited by: 8. Early life and education. Audrey Smith was born in India on 21 Mayand baptized at Chindwara, India, one of two children of Alan Kenyon Smith, who worked for the Indian Civil Service, and his wife, Gertrude May Smith.

Inshe graduated from King's College, London with a first class honours BSc in general science, and inwith a BSc from Bedford Alma mater: King's College, London and Bedford. @article{osti_, title = {Fundamental aspects of the freezing of cells, with emphasis on mammalian ova and embryos.

(Aspectos fundamentales de la congelacion de celulas, especialmente ovulos y embriones de mamiferos}, author = {Mazur, P}, abstractNote = {For most cells there exists an optimum cooling rate.

Both supraoptimal rates and suboptimal rates can. Supercooling In slow-freezing methods cells are brought into a suitable freezing medium and cooling is continued below the freezing point of the medium. Ice formation does not necessarily start at the freezing point.

Small ice crystals have a lower melting/freezing point than “bulk” ice, due to their large surface Size: KB. THE EFFECTS ON BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS OF FREEZING AND DRYING BY VACUUM SUBLIMATION THE EFFECTS ON BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS OF FREEZING AND DRYING BY VACUUM SUBLIMATION Greiff, Donald; Blumenthal, Herman; Chiga, Masahiro; Pinkerton, Henry (Received for publication, March 8, ) In the preceding paper of this.

From Cryonics, March The Cryobiological Case For Cryonics [Note: This article was written in It summarizes much indirect evidence that supported the practice of cryonics at that time.

An article covering more recent advances and evidence is The Arrest of Biological Time as a Bridge to Engineered Negligible Senescence.] Introduction. She is also remembered for a classic monograph "The Biological Effects of Freezing and Supercooling".

Ita Askonas () worked in many areas of immunology. Her work on cytotoxic T-cells was. The Place of the Regional Hospital in Postgraduate Education: the Provinces (1 August, ) Free.

A method to actively controlling crystallization is one of promising technique for cryopreservation. The object of this paper is to study the effect of ultrasonic irradiation on ice formation during freezing of biological tissue with supercooling.

In the experiments, agar gel was frozen under irradiation of ultrasound at frequency of : Yukio Tada, Yoshiaki Satou, Makoto Kurokawa, Akira Takimoto, Hajime Onishi. The stochastic nature of nucleation during the freezing step of the freeze-drying process has been regarded as a demerit in a process which is considered under rigorous control.

The freezing performance of a product can impact its subsequent drying behaviour and the final product quality attributes.

Hence, the idea to control this stochastic event and thus to directly. @article{osti_, title = {Fundamental aspects of the freezing of cells, with emphasis on mammalian ova and embryos}, author = {Mazur, P.}, abstractNote = {The problem in cryobiology is how to cool cells to /sup 0/C and return them to normal temperatures without killing them.

One important factor is the presence of a protective additive like glycerol or dimethyl sulfoxide. Freezing point, temperature at which a liquid becomes a solid. As with the melting point, increased pressure usually raises the freezing freezing point is lower than the melting point in the case of mixtures and for certain organic compounds such as fats.

As a mixture freezes, the solid that forms first usually has a composition different from that of the liquid, and. Supercooling is the process by which water cools below its freezing point without changing phase into a solid, due to the lack of a nucleation source.

Water requires a particle such as dust in order to crystallize and if no source of nucleation is introduced. Anchor ice is defined by the World Meteorological Organization as "submerged ice attached or anchored to the bottom, irrespective of the nature of its formation".

It may also be called bottom-fast ice. Anchor ice is most commonly observed in fast-flowing rivers during periods of extreme cold, at the mouths of rivers flowing into very cold seawater, in the shallow sub or intertidal. We review the Mpemba effect, where initially hot water freezes faster than initially cold water.

Although the effect might appear impossible, it has been observed in numerous experiments and was discussed by Aristotle, Francis Bacon, Roger Bacon, and Descartes. It has a rich and fascinating history, including the story of the secondary school student, Erasto Cited by: Comparing supercooling points of different Laricobius spp.

and populations in southwestern Virginia is intended to provide an additional indicator as to which biocontrol agent would be best suited for this region of the country, as it has been found that biological control agents can fail to establish if their introduced range is not Author: Ashley A.

Toland, Holly A. Wantuch, Donald E. Mullins, Thomas P. Kuhar, Scott M. Salom. The biological effects of cooling are dominated by the freezing of water, which results in the concentration of the solutes that are dissolved in the remaining liquid phase. Rival theories of freezing injury have envisaged either that ice crystals pierce or tease apart the cells, destroying them by direct mechanical action, or that damage is Cited by: Ice nucleation mechanisms.

An ice nucleus is a particle which acts as the nucleus for the formation of an ice crystal in the atmosphere. There are a number of mechanisms of ice nucleation in the atmosphere through which ice nuclei can catalyse the formation of ice particles.

In the upper troposphere, water vapor can deposit directly onto solid. By Gerald Feinberg New methods for freezing and storing at low temperatures might lead to many new potentialities for the human race, the most exciting of which would be the opportunity for dying individuals to avail themselves of future medical progress.

Successful experiments have already been done with cells and lower animals, but many problems. Flash freezing refers to the process whereby objects are frozen in just a few hours by subjecting them to cryogenic temperatures, or through direct contact with liquid nitrogen at − °C (− °F).

When water is supercooled to temperatures below −48 °C (−54 °F), it must freeze. Freezing water is a central issue for climate, geology and life.

Biological effects of deuterium-depleted water (DDW) Since water is a major source of hydrogen, and since most living organisms are 50 – 75% water, scientists have begun to investigate the effects of deuterium-depleted water—water with a reduced amount of deuterium.

Discoveries in the last fifteen years have been groundbreaking. The Mpemba effect is the name given to the assertion that it is quicker to cool water to a given temperature when the initial temperature is higher.

This assertion seems counter-intuitive and yet Cited by: 6. BOOK CHAPTERS Wisniewski, M., G. Davis, and R. Arora. - The role of pit membrane structure in deep supercooling of xylem parenchyma. In: Recent Advances in Plant Cold Hardiness, Paul Li (ed), CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL pp.

Wisniewski, M., R. Arora. Adaptation and response of fruit trees to freezing temperatures.Life in the Frozen State is a comprehensive review of the effects of freezing on living organisms. A major feature of the book is the combining of fundamental theory and practice across a wide range of species and applications.

Biological Effects of Freezing and Supercooling ().Freezing point depression is a colligative property of matter. Colligative properties depend on the number of particles present, not on the type of particles or their mass. So, for example, if both calcium chloride (CaCl 2) and sodium chloride (NaCl) completely dissolve in water, the calcium chloride would lower the freezing point more than the sodium chloride because it would .